English English Nederlands Nederlands Deutsch Deutsch Italiano Italiano Español Español Français Français 简体中文 简体中文 Português Português Русский Русский
    DetailingWiki Newsletter
    Get free and automatic updates on new articles
    We respect your privacy. No data is used for anything other than sending the newsletter!

    Advertisement

The best detailing brush

Written by:

It is often asked on detailing fora and social media: “what is the best detailing brush”. Off course there is a difference between certain products and brands, but it is important to know what you are asking. In this guide I will try to explain what the problem is with this question unless it is asked more in-depth.

The general problem

When somebody asks what the best shampoo is, they are not letting other people know what they mean with “best”. A shampoo is developed with several characteristics in mind. It has to be slick, good soluble in water, good cleaning properties, wax/sealant-safe and several more. These properties can be very different between products and/or brands. In the question “What is the best shampoo”, it is nowhere specified if that person is looking for a shampoo that is very slick, if it just smells nice or if it is the least protection-affecting.
So it is almost impossible to give an answer.

What to keep in mind when you ask the question

Many detailers are searching for a certain product that offers good quality. This could mean that they are looking for a cheap product, one that smells good, etc. Before you ask the question which product is the best it is important to know what you are looking for. Are you looking for a wax that offers mainly gloss? Or is easy to buff off? Or one that offers as much gloss?

It is important to know what you are looking for, and to know that there will be cases in which 2 properties can not be combined. A shampoo that is really awesome at washing away stubborn grease can not be wax safe. Simply because you need a certain harshness to remove the grease, harshness that is more then the wax can handle. Even sealants are likely to be affected by this.

A list of things to consider

Here is a list of properties you might consider including in your question. These can be your own preferences, or just things you find important. This list is simply made to help you find out what you exactly want to ask, so you will get better answers that suit your search.

Detailing brush

  • Brush or handle
  • Short hair or long hair
  • Hard bristles or soft bristles
  • Big or small

Different related articles

  • Simoniz
    Manufacturers
    Simoniz is an American brand of car detailing products that are being sold all around the world. They offer a wide range of products and services, aimed at creating a network of professional detailer who use their products....
  • Blow-drying your car
    Detailing Miscellaneous
    There are multiple ways of drying your car. The most common one is drying with Microfiber towels. However, you can also use a device that blows air for blow-drying off the water. This can especially be handy when you have to deal with small spaces, crevices or trims that can hide water....
  • Last Step Product (LSP)
    Detailing Miscellaneous
    A Last Step Product (LSP) is the product that you use in the last step of detailing. This is the "protection" part of detailing. The term is often used by people telling or asking what product was used to protect the achieved finish after a small or large detailing session. As abbreviations are popular, this term quickly become shortened into: LSP....
  • Kevin Brown Method: Cleaning your pad and how wetting agents help
    Correction
    Keeping your pad clean is very important, because the paint residue on/in your pad can cause scouring onto the paint surface. If the pad has become clogged, we can’t get a perfect finish....
  • Palm Beach Motoring Group
    Manufacturers
    Palm Beach Motoring Group, or PBMG, is the largest car care manufacturer, reseller and distributor in America. The company is owned by Vision Investments LLC. and is located in Florida, USA....
  • What is a paint thickness gauge (PTG)
    Correction
    A Paint Thickness Gauge (often abbreviated to PTG, and also called a Paint Depth Gauge) is an electronic device that measures the distance between the body-panel and the sensor. This way you can measure the thickness of the paint. This gives you an indication of how much paint you have left to work with....

Links to this article

There are no external links to this article. Yet.
Sidebar



Stay up to date with our free newsletter
Always be the first to know about new updates, articles and other informative content.
Don't miss out, opt in!
We respect your privacy. No data is used for anything other than sending the newsletter!