English English Nederlands Nederlands Deutsch Deutsch Italiano Italiano Español Español Français Français 简体中文 简体中文 Português Português Русский Русский
    DetailingWiki Newsletter
    Get free and automatic updates on new articles
    We respect your privacy. No data is used for anything other than sending the newsletter!

    Advertisement

Last Step Product (LSP)

Written by:

A Last Step Product (LSP) is the product that you use in the last step of detailing. This is the “protection” part of detailing. The term is often used by people telling or asking what product was used to protect the achieved finish after a small or large detailing session. As abbreviations are popular, this term quickly become shortened into: LSP.

Incorrect term

To be technical, the term “Last step product” isn’t fully correct. It refers to the “Last Step”, but any detailer will tell you that there is no “Last” step. Detailing is a continues form of maintenance and repairing/undoing general wear and tear.

Detailing steps
Detailing steps

This image show how the steps in a detailing process never end. If anything, the last step would probably be “maintenance”. Which would mean that a LSP refers to the shampoo used to maintain the achieved finish and cleanliness. In other cases, the term LSP refers to the last product you use before you hand over the keys of the car to the owner. In some cases this means that the last product was a polish, and sometimes it can even be a shampoo or snowfoam. It all depends on the steps that where taken to give the customer what he paid for.

What would be a common LSP

The term LSP commonly refers to a protective product. This could be a wax, coating or sealant. Technically, a transparent plastic foil would also have protective properties, but it is not commonly referred to as a protective product, and thus not commonly referred to when people speak of a “LSP”.
The most common products people mean when they mention a Last Step Product are:

These last 2 items can be a LSP when a customer requests to not use a regular protective product because the paint is fresh or it has no need for a protective layer (showcars that aren’t driven, only displayed). There can also be a case in which somebody applies a glaze on top of a protective product. As has been explain in the paragraph above, even a shampoo can technically be a LSP.

Different related articles

  • What is delamination
    Detailing Miscellaneous
    Delamination occurs when 2 layers seperate from each other. This can happen between many different types of material. Delamination can occur between 2 layers of paint, but also between a wax and a coating. Even when windowtint seperates from the window, it can be referred to as delamination....
  • How to make carpet stripes
    Guides
    Carpet stripes are lines in the carpet that give the impression that some parts of the carpet ar darker/lighter then the area next to it. This can be achieved by bending the fibers one way or the other. The only purpose of this is that it can look nice to some people. Customers might be impressed and like the effect....
  • What is a squeegee
    Maintenance
    The squeegee is a rubber handheld tool that is dragged over the surface, wiping off the water from the surface it is used on. The blade is usually made from (synthetic) rubber and is fairly flexible on its own. The use of the squeegee is a popular topic of debate because of its potential of creating surface imperfections....
  • Supagard
    Manufacturers
    Supagard is a Scottish webshop that sells their own products online. The company is roughly 30 years old and has a wide range of products available in their store. The company is based in Glasgow, Scotland....
  • Waxaddict
    Manufacturers
    Waxaddict is an English brand of detailing products that started out in 1997. The brand started out creating wax for their sister company: Waxybox....
  • Microfiber Care & Laundry
    Maintenance
    Microfiber Towels, mitts, sponges, and applicators are a crucial tool in a detailers arsenal for washing and drying a vehicle, removing smears from glass, dusting dashboards, cleaning trim, buffing sealants, waxes, or coatings, removing polishing residue, applying quick-detailing sprays, soaking excess detergent from cleaner-saturated textiles, and many more applications besides....

Links to this article

There are no external links to this article. Yet.
Sidebar



Stay up to date with our free newsletter
Always be the first to know about new updates, articles and other informative content.
Don't miss out, opt in!
We respect your privacy. No data is used for anything other than sending the newsletter!