DetailingWiki Newsletter
    Get free and automatic updates on new articles
    We respect your privacy. No data is used for anything other than sending the newsletter!

    Advertisement

How to wash your car in the summer

Written by:

Washing a car in the summer gives the risk of the sun evaporating the water quicker then it can be dried off. You either have to be quick or smart to prevent waterspots or dried up products. These tips might help you in reducing the risk.

Contents

The risk of washing in the summer

Washing your car in the burning sun might sound like a normal Saturday morning ritual. But it actually has a few downsides.
Just to name a few:

  • The water evaporates more quickly, and can leave watermarks (limescale).
  • Certain products (including wax and polish) can dry up to quickly, which can affect durability and/or effectiveness.
  • Can make certain products very difficult to remove.

Not everybody has the luxury of a garage or other place where the car can be parked in the shadow (or under a roof).

General tips and advice

There are a few things that can help to make it easier on yourself.

  • Check the forecast, perhaps it’s gonna get cloudy in a few hours. Perhaps the next day.
  • See how the sun moves, perhaps the car will be in the shadow if you waited a few hours.
  • Read the label of your product, check for anything regarding use in the sun.
  • If you have products that need to be diluted, dilute it with demi-water. This contains no/much less minerals and when it dries up, there will be no/not much watermarks.
  • Is there a do-it-yourself carwash nearby? These are usually covered.
  • A product that needs less (or no) water can also help to minimize the risk of watermarks. A (nearly) waterless wash can be used for this.
  • A product with limescale inhibitors and sheeting agents can help.

Extra things to consider

When you have no choice, these things can help you.

  • Start with the side that’s in the shadow, and try not to get the sun-side wet when rinsing.
  • After washing and rinsing the side that’s in the sun, dry it as quick as possible. (you can use the sheeting to get most of the water off)
  • Start drying the roof and the hood, these are often the most hot parts.
  • If the sun is only at one side of the car, wash the part first that is in the shadows. Then turn the car around and wash the other side. Running water over the panels should cool them down fairly quick.
  • Try not to use to many products that contain solvents, these will dry very quick and removal can become difficult.
  • You can put a big WET MF cloth on the hood/roof. As long as the cloth stays wet, the water underneath won’t dry up and/or leave watermarks.
  • Use an air-compressor to blow off most of the water. (don’t forget the crevices and small corners)
  • If possible, put the windows open before washing the car. This will slightly lower the interior temp, making the roof and windscreen a little bit less hot.
  • If you’re driving home and are going to wash the car asap, turn on the AC, the lower the interior temp, the lower the temp of the windscreen and roof (difference will be small, but every little bit helps).
  • Try to use a shampoo that has limescale inhibitors, this will help to prevent most of the watermarks.
  • Don’t use cold water in the bucket. Some shampoo dissolve a little bit less with cold water. Hot water helps to dissolve better (shampoo as well as some dirt).
  • You could use cold water to rinse with, but this could affect dissolving a little bit.
  • Many glass cleaners don’t work properly in the burning sun.
  • Doing one panel at a time, (washing, rinsing and drying) will also greatly reduce the risk of spots or dried up products

*the difference of dissolving in cold, luke and warm water is small, and will vary between shampoos. But every little thing might help.

In conclusion

In the end, detailing/washing the car in the hot burning (summer) sun just isn’t ideal. The best environment would be indoors at about 20 degrees Celsius. But sometimes you just don’t much choice. These tips might make it a bit easier and leave less marks.

Different related articles

  • Why is a proper washing technique important
    Guides
    Millions of people wash their car using a sponge. But if you read the threads on this forum you will see that hardly any members are washing their cars using a traditional sponge. Why is that? It all comes down to the flat face of the sponge. Imagine automotive paintwork with your typical dirt and grit particles stuck on the top of the paint, that you want to wash off to reveal your car's shine. Some of these dirt particles are sharp....
  • What is stripping
    Correction
    Stripping is the act of removing a certain product/residue/film from a surface, often with the purpose of re-applying a new product. Stripping can be done chemically or mechanically and is a common step when re-applying a new form of protection....
  • Blow-drying your car
    Detailing Miscellaneous
    There are multiple ways of drying your car. The most common one is drying with Microfiber towels. However, you can also use a device that blows air for blow-drying off the water. This can especially be handy when you have to deal with small spaces, crevices or trims that can hide water....
  • Autobrite Direct
    Manufacturers
    Autobrite Direct is a manufacturer and reseller of detailing products and equipment. The company is based in Staffordshire, United Kingdom and is established around 2003. The company also offers detailing courses and complete car care packages....
  • How to fix clogged detailing sprayers
    Guides
    Over time, certain detailing products clog spray heads. Typically this is due to either the thickeners in cleaners congealing and blocking the orifice, or sealant polymers curing inside the spray head assembly. Either way, a clogged spray bottle can render useless a perfectly good detailing product, and possibly prevent you from completing a detailing task. This is a guide on how to remedy this issue....
  • What is a tar remover
    Detailing Miscellaneous
    In the world of detailing, their are several special cleaning products. Among them is the tar remover. This is a special cleaning product to remove tar and often also glue residue. Tar can come from roads and sometimes at industrial places, it is used in asphalt roads and can be used at construction sites for roofing and some plumbing jobs. It doesn't cause damage, but shows up as ugly black spots which are notoriously difficult to remove....

Links to this article

There are no external links to this article. Yet.
Sidebar



Stay up to date with our free newsletter
Always be the first to know about new updates, articles and other informative content.
Don't miss out, opt in!
We respect your privacy. No data is used for anything other than sending the newsletter!